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Dentistry: A Healthy Lifestyle – Newton, Wellesley, MA

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners wants his patients to lead a healthy lifestyle and have outstanding oral health.  A recent article in Bicycling Magazine outlined the top ways to stay healthy and a regular visit to your dentist is critical.  According to Dr. Johnson, “A visit to the dentist can make your pearly whites shine—and keep your ticker on track, as well”.  In a recent Taiwanese study people who had their teeth cleaned at least twice a year for 2 years had a 24% lower risk of heart attack and a 13% lower risk of stroke compared with people who never went to the dentist. Professional teeth cleaning appears to reduce inflammation-causing bacterial growth, which can lead to dangerous inflammation, say the study authors.

Here’s the list: 

1.    Eat Calcium Rich Foods 2.    Fill up on Anti-oxidants 3.    Go to the Dentist 4.    Cook with Herbs and Spices 5.    Load up on Potassium 6.    Take Blood Pressure Medicine at Night 7.    Treat High Blood Pressure 8.    Stay Active 9.    Run a Mile 10.   Eat Walnuts 11.    Feast on Fish 12.    Sprinkle Flax Seed on your Cereal 13.    Eat Dark Chocolate…in Moderation 14.    Start your Day with Oatmeal 15.    Snack on Nuts 16.    Switch to a Better Cooking Oil

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Artwork: adobe stock photos

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Dental Problems Related to Scuba Diving – Newton, Wellesley, MA

A new survey of recreational scuba divers finds that 41 percent report dental problems related to diving. Most of the problems had to do with pain from the increased pressure underwater or from clutching the air regulator too tightly in their mouths, but a few people experienced loosened crowns or cracked fillings.  ryneDr. Ryne Johnson,  prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners reports that, “over my 30 years in clinical practice, I have seen numerous patient who presented with broken or shifted teeth induced by long-time use of a regulator”.  He further recommends, “The survey was limited, but suggests that people should make sure their teeth are in good shape before they go deep.  An unhealthy tooth underwater would be much more obvious than on the surface.  One hundred feet underwater is the last place you want to be with a fractured tooth."

Underwater toothache

Barodontalgia is a toothache caused by the increase in pressure felt underwater (it can also happen at high altitudes because of low pressure). The condition, which occurs while the person is in the high- or low-pressure environment, is most common in people who have some sort of underlying dental condition, like a cavity or poorly completed filling.  project1

Forty-one percent of respondents of a recent study said they'd experienced dental symptoms while diving. Of those, 42 percent said they'd had barodontalgia. The second-most common symptom was pain from holding the air regulator too tightly (24 percent of those who'd had a dental symptom), and the third-most common problem was jaw pain (22 percent of those who'd had a dental symptom).

Protecting your teeth

Several people reported that a dental crown — a cap that fits over a broken or damaged tooth — had loosened during a dive. One person reported a broken filling.  The dry air and awkward position of the jaw while clenching down on the regulator is an interesting mix. Dive instructors reported more pain and problems than casual divers.  Instructors spend more time at shallower diving depths, where the changes in pressure are most abrupt.

Divers are required to meet a standard of medical fitness before certification, but there are no dental health prerequisites," according to Dr. Johnson.  In the meantime, divers can protect themselves by visiting the dentist before scuba diving to check for decay and other problems.

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Original article: http://www.livescience.com Artwork: www.scubadiving.com

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Teeth Grinding & Stress – Newton, Wellesley, MA

Research has found a link between stress and teeth grinding, which 70 percent have reported. Known as bruxism, teeth grinding can go undetected as the most common symptom is a headache, usually concentrated at the temples of the head. Other symptoms include sleep disorders, ear ache, and stiff muscles in the jaw, shoulders and neck. The teeth will also show signs of wear, cracks and tooth loss can result.

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been treating teeth grindinryneg and TMJ therapy for over thirty years.  “Many people grind their teeth at night and we used custom-made, hard appliances (with a softer, resilient liner) to lessen the impact of this significant force” says Johnson.  “The night guard is designed to absorb the impact and spread the force out over all the teeth instead of allowing it to wear away the enamel”.

What the doctor says:  'If you suspect that you are suffering from Bruxism, it is important to see your dentist who can provide a proper diagnosis”.

“Grinding your teeth can be triggered by several factors project1including an underlying sleep disorder, stress and anxiety or a result of dietary intakes such as alcohol and caffeine”.

“Your dentist will recommend a guard specially made for your teeth to create a protective barrier from friction to prevent increased tooth wear and reduce discomfort of the jaw muscles.”

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To contact the office or Dr. Johnson, Click Here original article: http://www.dailymail.co.uk

artwork: http://www.arizonafamilydental.com/

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Dentistry After Root Canals Impact Tooth Longevity – Newton, Wellesley, MA

“Irynen a recent longitudinal, retrospective analysis, researchers found that what one does AFTER a root canal procedure directly influences the longevity of that tooth” says Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.  “Teeth with endodontic therapy have been hollowed out and need internal and external protection to prevent fracturing.  This cannot be accomplished with fillings, according to this study” says Dr. Johnson.  “After 30 years of restorative dentistry, I can attest that the best means to improve longevity on a root canaled tooth is with a dental crown”.

Methods

Computerized analysis was performed for all patients who received posterior RCT from 2008 to 2016 in the graduate endodontic department. Data collected included dates of RCT, type of post-endodontic restoration, and time of extraction if extracted. Teeth that received crown after RCT were also divided into 2 groups: receiving crown before 4 months and after 4 months after RCT. Data were analyzed by using Kaplan-Meier log-rank test and Cox regression model (α = 0.05) by using SPPS Statistic 21.

Results

Type of restoration after RCT significantly affected the survival.  Those that received composite/amalgam buildup restorations were 2.29 times more likely to be extracted compared with those that received crown. Time of crown placementproject1 after RCT was also significantly correlated with survival rate. Teeth that received crown 4 months after RCT were almost 3 times more likely to get extracted compared with teeth that received crown within 4 months of RCT.

Thus, according to Boston’s best prosthodontist, “it’s best to protect the tooth as soon as possible to avoid problems”.

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Original article: http://www.ada.org Artwork: www.OswegoSmiles.com

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Using Computers in Implant Dentistry – Newton, Wellesley, MA

There is archeological evidence that humans have attempted to replace missing teeth with root form implants for thousands of years. Remains from ancient China (dating 4000 years ago) have carved bamboo pegs, tapped into the bone, to replace lost teeth, and 2000-year-old remains from ancient Egypt have similarly shaped pegs made of precious metals.

In 1952 the Swedish orthopaedic surgeon, Per-Ingvar Brånemark,project3 was interested in studying bone healing and regeneration. During his research time at Lund University he adopted the Cambridge designed "rabbit ear chamber" for use in the rabbit femur. Following the study, he attempted to retrieve these expensive chambers from the rabbits and found that he was unable to remove them. Brånemark observed that bone had grown into such close proximity with the titanium that it effectively adhered to the metal and the birth of current day implants was seen.

ryneDr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, whom many consider a pioneer in using computer in implant dentistry, has developed a synergistic technique to remove many of the early pitfalls seen in implant placement and dental prosthetics.  He has been performing implant reconstructions since 1989 with the assistance of computers.  His current approach is outlined below:

1.    Initial examination and work up to simulate the final design of the dental prosthesis (think architectural plans when building a home). 2.    Create a three dimensional representation of this plan (either a denture or some other means to position teeth for the patient & doctor to evaluate form, aesthetics, phoneticsproject1 3.    Convert this into a X-ray scanning guide (to wear during the CT scan) or to scan the mouth with CAD/CAM appliance 4.    Merge the digital data into software that creates a 3-D image of the newly designed plan overlaid onto the existing bone contoursproject4 5.    Evaluate bone and other anatomical structures related to planned implant placement 6.    Determine implant angulation, length, diameter, position, etc 7.    Create a surgical placement jig 8.    Place implants using placement jig 9.    Place dental prosthesis (often at same visit as implant placement)

Dr. Johnson uses this approach on most of his dental implant cases and states, “I can’t imagine why more clinicians are not following this protocol as it has diminished our complications and often allows our patients to go home with a ‘tooth’ the same day implants are placed.  Why accept less?

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Original content:  www.wikipedia.com Artwork:  www.perfectdentalimplant.com, www.wikipedia, www.texasimplant.com

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NEWTON WELLESLEYOrthopedic Associates iconDENTAL PARTNERS
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      Newton Office:
      447 Centre Street
      Newton, MA - 02458
      Tel : (617) 965-1225

      Wellesley Office:
      332 Washington Street - Suite 240
      Wellesley, MA 02481
      Tel. 781.235.6300

      info@newtonwellesleydentalpartners.org

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