Posts Tagged ‘ambrose’

Can Gum Disease Affect Ovulation?

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “Women struggling to get pregnant need to take good care of their gums, a study has found. Bacteria that causes gum infections appears to have a role in making conception take longer”.  According to a recent study, “Women with bacteria that causes gum disease in their saliva, P. Gingivalis, took three times longer to get pregnant than women without. And women with the bug as well as symptoms of periodontitis - disease of the gum and underlying bone - took four times longer”. Researchers believe that infection in the gums and jawbone leads to further inflammation in the body. This inflammation may prevent ovulation or could stop the embryo implanting. Women struggling to get pregnant need to take good care of their gums, a study has found. Researchers think gum disease might be a warning sign of problems elsewhere in the body - particularly type two diabetes and heart disease”. Additionally, post-menopausal women are more likely to die early if they have gum disease according to this study.  Women who lose teeth after the menopause are at a higher risk of an early death, experts have warned. A major study suggests gum disease and tooth loss is a red flag for severe health problems. Study leader Dr Michael LaMonte, of the University at Buffalo in New York, said no matter the cause of the link, more intensive dental screening in old age could help nip problems in the bud. Other possible effects are inflammation interfering with hormone production, as well as contributing to endometriosis, a condition where tissue that normally grows inside the womb grows elsewhere in the body.  Dr Susanna Paju, of the University of Helsinki said: ‘Our study does not answer the question on possible reasons for infertility but it shows that periodontal bacteria may have a systemic effect even in lower amounts, and even before clear clinical signs of gum disease can be seen. Thus, Dr. Johnson suggests that, “results encourage young women of fertile age to take care of their oral health and attend periodontal evaluations regularly”. How the study was carried out: Researchers at the University of Helsinki studied 256 healthy non-pregnant women aged between 19 and 42 who had stopped contraception and were trying to get pregnant. The health of their mouths and gums, as well as their reproductive organs, were examined.  Over 12 months they were observed as to whether they became pregnant or not.  Researchers believe gum infection leads to further inflammation that may prevent ovulation.   Key findings : Gingivalis Bacteria was ‘significantly more frequently detected in the saliva among women who did not become pregnant during the one-year follow-up period than among those who did.’ The research found women who either had P. Gingivalis in their saliva – or antibodies indicating they had been infected by P Gingivalis, were three times less likely to get pregnant, while those with the bacteria and signs of gum disease were four times less likely to get pregnant. The bacteria remained a factor even after other factors that have an effect on getting pregnant such as socioeconomic status, general health and smoking were considered. Original article:  www.dailymail.co.uk/health Artwork:  www.freepik.com  

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The Latest on Teeth Whitening

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners was recently interviewed for a national magazine that was developing a synopsis of cosmetic dental procedures.  According to Dr. Johnson, “Tooth whitening has become one of the most frequently requested dental procedures in his office. The public has come to demand whiter, more perfect smiles and in response many choices for tooth whitening have been made available. These include home-based products such as toothpastes, gels, and films, as well as in-office based systems where products containing highly concentrated bleaching agents are applied under professional supervision". The profession and public have been aware of certain risks related to tooth whitening such as increased tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation. New research has shown that there are other risks such as tooth surface roughening and softening, increased potential for demineralization, degradation of dental restorations, and unacceptable color change of dental restorations. The new research is also focused on optimizing whitening procedures to reduce tooth sensitivity and to increase the persistence of the whitening.   Types of Teeth Whitening Systems Whitening systems can be variously categorized. The following approach is in accordance with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. Whitening Toothpastesproject1 Whitening toothpastes typically contain higher amounts of abrasives and detergents than standard toothpastes, to remove tougher stains. Whitening toothpastes do not contain bleach (sodium hypochlorite) but some contain low concentrations of carbamide peroxide or hydrogen peroxide that help lighten tooth color. Whitening toothpastes typically can lighten tooth color by about one or two shades. OTC Whitening Strips and Gels Whitening strips were introduced into the market in the late 1980’s. They deliver a thin layer of peroxide gel on plastic strips shaped to fit onto the buccal surfaces of the teeth. There are a variety of white strip products on the market with varying instructions. A typical set of instructions are to apply the strips twice daily for 30 minutes for 14 days. project2Tooth lightening can be seen in several days and this method can lighten the teeth by 1 or 2 shades. There are some newer whitening strip products that require only one 30-minute application per day that have the same whitening end point as the two-a-day products. Whitening gels are peroxide-based gels applied with a small brush directly to the surface of the teeth. Manufacturer’s instructions are usually twice a day applications for 14 days. Like the whitening strips, the teeth can usually be lightened by 1 or 2 shades. Whitening Rinses Whitening rinses contain oxygen sources such as hydrogen peroxide to react with the chromogens.project3 Manufacturer’s instructions are for twice a day rinsing for 60 seconds each. It takes up to 3 months to see a 1 or 2 shade improvement in tooth color. Tray-Based Tooth Whiteners Tray-based tooth whitening systems are available both professionally and OTC. This method involves use of a fitted tray containing carbamide peroxide-bleaching gel worn fproject4or 2 to 4 hours a day or overnight. Usually by following the manufacturer instructions tooth whitening is noticeable in a few days, lightening the teeth by 1 or 2 shades. In-Office Whitening Quicker tooth lightening can be achieved through in-office whitening because the products deliver higher concentrations of peroxide than OTC. Consequently, gingival tissues are usually protected before the agent is applied. Some products claim to increase the oxidation of chromogens by exposure to heat or an intense blue light with a wave length between 480 nm and 520 nm to activate the product while on the tooth, causing the chemical reactions to proceed faster. Some professionals use laser systems to increase the rate of the chemical reactions. This use of lasers is considered to be an ‘off-label’ use of laser systems in dentistry by the US Food and Drug Administration. In a systematic review by Buchalla and Attin no added benefit from light-activated systems was found and thus the American Dental Association does not endorse such whitening systems.project5 Tooth lightening results are seen after one 30- to 60-minute treatment. More dramatic results can be obtained with several applications. Risks associated with Tooth Whitening Risks commonly reported with tooth whitening include increased tooth sensitivity and mild gingival irritation. The degree of these side effects is directly related to the concentration of the peroxide bleach component, duration of the treatment, and the non-bleach composition of the product used. Tooth sensitivity usually occurs at the time of treatment and can last several days; gingival irritation begins within a day of the treatment and can also last several days. There are additional risks that have been reported from in vitro studies which include tooth erosion, tooth mineral degradation, increased susceptibility to demineralization, and pulpal damage.4 The ultimate endpoint for tooth whitening is dependent upon the tooth itself, with common wisdom telling us that all treatment regimens will eventually arrive at the same whitening endpoint. This is not exactly true as some very aggressive regimens can damage the tooth through dehydration and demineralization such that the tooth temporarily appears whiter.   Dr. Ryne Johnson, who first lectured on tooth whitening procedures in 1989, has helped thousands of patients achieve a more beautiful smile, often incorporating this proven technique. For other blogs on important dental topics, click here To contact Dr. Johnson, click here. Original article:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Artwork: www.dentalguideaustralia.com , www.askthedentist.com , www.webmd.com , www.parasomnia.tk , www.denmat.com  

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Tongue Scraping and Oral Health – Newton, Wellesley, MA

It’s been hammered into our heads to brush twice a day, floss once (though that's up for debate) and maybe rinse with a fluoride mouthwash. Dr. Ryne Johnson, managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners suggests that,  “in addition to your current dental routine: tongue scraping should be considered”. But is this ayurvedic practice that dates back to ancient India really worth your while? Project1

Dr. Johnson, recommends the practice to all of his patients.  “Most of my clients don't realize the effectiveness of tongue scraping until they actually do it and see all the gunk that comes off their tongue,” he says. “The tongue is the perfect breeding ground for bacteria, but although we take care of our teeth and our gums regularly, we don't pay nearly as much attention to our tongue. The bacteria on your tongue is one of the main causes of bad breath, so scraping it regularly can significantly improve your breath over time".  In fact, a recent study showed about 85 percent of all bad breath cases begin in the mouth and half are caused by bacteria residue on the tongue. Brushing your tongue is "the best way to ensure that your breath stays fresh throughout the day,” Williamson says.

However Kimberly Harms, DDS,  a spokesperson for the American Dental Association, says "your taste buds in the back are made for bacteria to hide." And when your mouth has a lot of bacteria in it, you can taste it. “That sour taste is often due to bacteria," she says.  If you often suffer from dry mouth, this quick health routine can help that, too. “If you’re not producing enough saliva when you chew, you may have digestive issues,” Harms says. “Scraping can help.”

How to do it

“A scraper is an efficient way to remove all that’s coating your tongue,” Harms says. Here are four things to keep in mind as you scrape: 1. Buy a dedicated tongue scraper (they cost as little as $6) that comes in plastic or metal and is usually shaped like the letter U. 2. Always be gentle — scraping your tongue should never hurt. 3. Scrape only five to 10 times, Harms suggests. 4. Don't go too deep. "Since we have a gag reflex, be sure not to put the scraper too far back in your mouth,” she adds.

“It’s a wonderful thing,” Harms says. “We don’t like to praise things without research but tongue scraping makes sense. If you’re successful at brushing twice a day and flossing daily, great. Do that first. Consider tongue scraping a great adjunct to good oral hygiene.”

For additional Blog Topics by Dr. Johnson, click here To contact Dr. Johnson or the office, click here

original article: www.mnn.com/health artwork: www.wisdomsofhealth.com

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Biting force extends one’s life – Newton, Wellesley, MA

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “ One’s ability to chew has a direct correlation with longevity.  Many studies show that one loses 75% chewing strength wearing a denture”.  The force of a man’s bite at age 70 may be a marker of his longevity, says a study in the Journal of Oral Rehabilitation.Project1

The risk of dying before reaching their mid-80s was 84% higher in men with a weaker bite than those with a stronger bite, the study found. The association was significant even when such factors as tooth loss and severe gum disease were included in the analysis.

No connection was found between jaw strength and long-term survival in women of the same age group.

Low bite force may be a sign of poor dental work, loss of teeth and this musculoskeletal decline that can ultimately lead to disability and death, the study suggests. Low intake of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients can also affect oral health and increase people’s vulnerability to chronic disease, the researchers said.

The study, conducted in Japan, involved 559 people born in 1927, who were enrolled in a larger study in 1998. At the start of that study, the subjects underwent dental and medical examinations and reported personal information, such as diet, chewing ability and smoking habits, on surveys.

Dr. Johnson suggests that you see your dentist routinely and address factors that will influence your bite force.  If you are wearing a removable prosthesis, consider implants as an adjunctive approach to improve your chewing ability…and this is likely to increase your life expectancy.

For additional Blog Topics by Dr. Johnson, Click Here

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Original article:  www.wsj.com Artwork:  www.webmd.com

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Banking Your Child’s Tooth? – Newton, Wellesley, MA

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, many people are now saving their child’s extracted teeth for stem cell preservation.  While it may be a relatively new process, the development of stem cell therapy holds significant promise and banking this ‘insurance policy’ may ultimately save your child’s life or help correct a major disease later in life”.  Project1 Below are some talking points, but remember, it is important to discuss these matters with your dentist BEFORE the visit is scheduled: What are dental pulp stem cells:  Dental pulp is the soft living tissue inside a tooth. Stem cells are found inside the dental pulp. Dental pulp stem cells retain the ability to renew themselves by dividing and can change into specialized cells. When is the best time to save stem cells: The ideal opportunity to harvest dental stem cells occurs when children and young adults are losing their deciduous (baby) teeth either thorough natural exfoliation or extraction for orthodontia. The teeth that contain the highest quantity and quality of stem cells will be those that maintain a blood supply until they are harvested. Are these cells currently being used for treatments: Dental pulp stem cells, are being used only in laboratory settings at this time. While mesenchymal (MSC) cells are currently used in procedures such as bone marrow transplants, MSC cells from dental pulp are not yet being used for medical treatments. What types of cells can MSC cells become? •    Cardio Myocytes which have the potential to repair damaged cardiac tissue following a heart attack. •    Myocytes which have the potential to repair muscle. •    Osteocytes which have the potential to generate bone. •    Chondrocytes which have the potential to generate cartilage. •    Neuronal which have the potential to generate nerve and brain tissue. •    Adipocytes which have the potential to generate fat tissue. When were dental pulp stem cells first identified:  Stem cells in dental pulp were discovered in 2000 by Dr. Songtao Shi, a dental researcher at the National Institute of Health (NIH). After verification that these cells were in fact viable stem cells, the NIH announced the discovery in 2003. How long can stem cells be stored: We know that stem cells from the late 1980’s are still viable. In fact, most research indicates that stem cells frozen through a slow-rate process and stored with liquid nitrogen are viable for an indefinite period. Why is dental pulp a great source of stem cells: Dental pulp stem cells can be harvested without controversy, in an inexpensive, non-invasive manner, unlike bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell collection. These methods of stem cell recovery can be both painful and expensive. Umbilical cord blood, another source of stem cells, is a once in a lifetime opportunity at birth. Umbilical cord blood stem cells recovered are typically only used in disease treatment. How is dental pulp collected: Dental pulp collection is simple and poses no risk to the client. The tooth is either extracted or is harvested when it falls our naturally. Next a sterile transport medium is used to ship the tooth to the laboratory. The lab removes the dental pulp from tooth, processes, and then cryogenically preserves and stores the stem cells. Why do I need my dentist to harvest the teeth: It is important to have your dentist or oral surgeon work with you to harvest a healthy tooth for preservation because with their help, you will be able to remove the tooth while a good blood supply is still present. If the tooth is allowed to fall out at home, there is less possibility of finding viable stem cells. What happens if my child’s tooth is falling out early and my dentist has not received the kit: Detailed instructions on collecting dental pulp without a collection kit on hand are available. These instructions can be faxed or e-mailed to your dentist. In an extreme emergency the tooth may be stored in milk in your refrigerator for a BRIEF period of time. How do you prevent the stem cells from damage during the freezing process: The laboratory’s processing technique follows the FDA guidelines of minimal manipulation. The stem cells are prepped for slow-freeze by using a cryoprotectant which prevents damage. The cryoprotectant is washed out of the stem cells in the thawing. Research has shown that this methodology is the most successful in terms of cell recovery. How are the stem cells stored: Stem cells are stored individually in a sealed cryo-container. The cryo-container is designed specifically for long-term cryogenic storage. The container is coded and then placed in a jacketed vapor tank cooled by liquid nitrogen. This type of cooling method prevents all cross contamination. What systems are in place to protect stem cells during long-term storage: The cryogenic facility maintains multiple levels of security. This includes back up alarm systems, 24 hour on-call staff, 24 hour temperature monitoring, and a gravity driven liquid nitrogen system which does not depend on electricity. For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson, Click Here To contact the office, Click Here Original content can be found at:  http://www.toothbank.com/faq/  or  http://www.ndpl.net/faqs.php Original artwork:  www.pellasmiles.com

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