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Dental Problems Related to Scuba Diving – Newton, Wellesley, MA

A new survey of recreational scuba divers finds that 41 percent report dental problems related to diving. Most of the problems had to do with pain from the increased pressure underwater or from clutching the air regulator too tightly in their mouths, but a few people experienced loosened crowns or cracked fillings.  ryneDr. Ryne Johnson,  prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners reports that, “over my 30 years in clinical practice, I have seen numerous patient who presented with broken or shifted teeth induced by long-time use of a regulator”.  He further recommends, “The survey was limited, but suggests that people should make sure their teeth are in good shape before they go deep.  An unhealthy tooth underwater would be much more obvious than on the surface.  One hundred feet underwater is the last place you want to be with a fractured tooth."

Underwater toothache

Barodontalgia is a toothache caused by the increase in pressure felt underwater (it can also happen at high altitudes because of low pressure). The condition, which occurs while the person is in the high- or low-pressure environment, is most common in people who have some sort of underlying dental condition, like a cavity or poorly completed filling.  project1

Forty-one percent of respondents of a recent study said they'd experienced dental symptoms while diving. Of those, 42 percent said they'd had barodontalgia. The second-most common symptom was pain from holding the air regulator too tightly (24 percent of those who'd had a dental symptom), and the third-most common problem was jaw pain (22 percent of those who'd had a dental symptom).

Protecting your teeth

Several people reported that a dental crown — a cap that fits over a broken or damaged tooth — had loosened during a dive. One person reported a broken filling.  The dry air and awkward position of the jaw while clenching down on the regulator is an interesting mix. Dive instructors reported more pain and problems than casual divers.  Instructors spend more time at shallower diving depths, where the changes in pressure are most abrupt.

Divers are required to meet a standard of medical fitness before certification, but there are no dental health prerequisites," according to Dr. Johnson.  In the meantime, divers can protect themselves by visiting the dentist before scuba diving to check for decay and other problems.

For more blogs by Dr. Johnson, Click Here To contact Dr. Johnson or the office, Click Here

Original article: http://www.livescience.com Artwork: www.scubadiving.com

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Dental Implants, A Patient’s Primer – Newton, Wellesley, MA

Dental implants have become ‘mainstream’ as a treatment option for many patients.  Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist rsj-10-10-16and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been doing implant supported reconstructions since 1988 and has been regarded as a pioneer in the synergistic use of CT Scans, CAD/CAMs and state of the art dental material science to deliver outstanding results.  He wants people to have some perspective on the process:

Before the procedure

Dental implants require a strong jaw bone. Patients who have lost a lot of jawbone may need to have a bone graft procedure performed before this procedure. Dr. Johnson will identify the available bone…sometimes with a CT Scan if necessary.  In some instances, this can be done BEFORE any teeth are removed (implants may be placed the same day) or AFTER the area has healed from tooth removal (with adequate bone preservation techniques employed at the time of extraction).

You will receive instructions about how to prepare for the day of the procedure. It is highly recommended you quit smoking several months before the procedure as smoking can cause poor osseointegration (poor bone and implant integration), which is the leading cause of implant failure.

Anesthetic

The procedure starts with a local anesthetic. This will make the implant site and the area around it completely numb. project1You will be awake, but you won't be able to feel any pain in that area. You might still feel pressure, vibrations, or some other sensations that might be uncomfortable, but no pain. Some offices offer conscious sedation or partial sedation where you are awake and numb, but "out of it" and mostly unaware of what is going on. Some people describe the feeling as similar to being drunk. Partial sedation is usually more expensive than local anesthetic and is not available at every office.

A dentist applies local anesthetic to a patient's lower jaw. A numbing gel is usually applied so that the patient will not feel the injection.

Preparing the implant site

After the anesthetic has taken effect, the implant site will be prepared and the gums will be retracted so the dentist can access the jawbone and evaluate the implant site. The bone needs to be relatively flat and smooth, and the dentist might use a drill to reshape it.

Drilling the pilot hole

The dentist will then use a series of drills to make a hole in the jawbone for the implant (s)…sometimes a “placement jig” will be fabricated from the CT Scan work up. They will first create a divot using a small round bur, and then a pilot drill to create a pilot hole. They may use a plastic jig prepared from plaster casts to help guide the pilot drill, but this is mostly up to the dentist if they need one. They may also use an alignment pin to make sure the pilot hole is on target. project4If no adjustments are needed, the pilot hole will be drilled deeper. As the hole is being created, the dentist may flush the area with water or saline to keep the bone cool and prevent overheating caused by drilling. Once the pilot hole is finished they will check its alignment again using the alignment pin. If the positioning of the implant is close to other anatomical structures, such as nerves or blood vessels, they may take an x-ray with the alignment pin in place to check its position.

Finishing the hole

When the pilot hole is finished, the dentist will use a series of increasingly larger drill bits until it's the correct diameter for the implant. The size of the implant will have been chosen ahead of time based on the condition of the bone.Usually, your dentist will want to select the largest implant that your bone can sustain because larger implants distribute their load to the bone better than smaller implants do. Most are about 4 mm in diameter.

After the hole for the implant is finished, the alignment will be checked again using the pin. Then the whole will be threaded using a screw tap to match the threads on the implant. Some implants are self-tapping and don't require this step. Dental implants are roughly the size of the root of a normal tooth.

Placing the implant

Finally, the implant will be placed. This can be done using a special head for the dental drill or using a small hand wrench. Sometimes it is actually done using a small torque wrench. This can cause some unpleasant sensations but skilled surgeons are able to minimize the discomfort. The surgical site will be closed using an implant cap and stitches.

Healing and osseointegration

The stitches will be left in place for 7 to 10 days, after which they will be removed. In some cases, the gum flaps may be stitched so that they cover the implant cap as the site heals and the gum tissue will later be trimmed back when the abutment is placed. The implant will be given 3 to 6 months to osseointegrate (fuse with the bone) before the restoration (consisting of the abutment and crown) is placed.

Note: It is extremely important that you keep the implant area and surrounding teeth clean. Peri-implantitis isproject3 a condition that is caused by bacteria infecting the area surrounding an implant and can cause bone loss and implant failure due to poor osseointegration. Some clinics offer "immediate load" implants where a temporary restoration is placed the same day as the implant. This restoration will be removed in the future and a permanent one placed. Not every patient is a candidate for immediate load implants; this is an option you should discuss with your dentist. The treatment will be completed on a second trip, after osseointegration is complete and the abutment and prosthesis is custom-made. Dental implants are made up of three parts; the implant (screw), the abutment (stump), and the crown (tooth).

Final/Definitive restoration

After the implant has healed and is stable, the definitive restoration can be placed. This can consist of a crown, bridge, or denture. The implant cap (think ‘manhoproject2le cover’) is removed and replaced with an abutment and the dental prosthesis is placed on top of it. For most conventional implants, this is a crown that either screws on to the abutment or is cemented in place. Removable restorations like dentures may have clips or snaps of some kind.

After the procedure

Most patients are extremely satisfied after dental implants. After the implant is placed, your dentist will advise you to stick to chewing soft foods while the implant osseointegrates. Immediate load implants will also need time to osseointegrate, and your dentist will tell you when the temporary parts of the implant need to be replaced with a permanent restoration. Patients who have had dental implant surgery say that the pain is mostly a dull ache in their jaw after the anesthetic wears off and it is gone completely within a week. After the final restoration is complete, though, patients are able to treat the prosthetic like a normal tooth and can hardly tell the difference. They look, feel, and can be used just like normal teeth.

For more blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here For more information on dental implants or to arrange a consultation, contact Newton Wellesely Dental Partners.

Original article:  www.medigo.com

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8 Dirty Bathroom Mistakes You’re Probably Making – Newton, Wellesley, MA

8 Dirty Bathroom Mistakes your probably making

By now, you're probably on autopilot when it comes to your bathroom routine. But are your ingrained habits the cleanest ones? Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners want to make sure you're not making these mistakes:

1. You don't shut the toilet lid when you flush In a Scrubbing Bubbles survey, 60 per cent of respondents indicated that they skip this important hygienic habit. And this is a big deal: If you leave the lid up when you flush, germy water particles (and whatever else is in the toilet) project1can spray across the room — up to six feet away from the toilet. This fact was first discussed in a 1975 study completed by germ expert Dr. Charles Gerba, and has been proven time and again. He and his team found that bacteria can linger in the air long enough to settle in a filthy film all around the room — so make sure everyone in your household is onboard with a lid-down flushing protocol.

2. You store your toothbrush in the medicine cabinet You might think this a clever way to keep toilet bacteria from reaching your brush, but you could be trading one ill-advised move for another. Trapped in a cabinet or container, your brush may not be able to dry between uses, creating a welcome environment for bacteria. The American Dental Association recommends storing toothbrushes in an upright position, and not touching other brushes, to mitigate the risk of cross-contamination. And shut that toilet lid!

3. You leave your makeup and brushes out on the counter Anything you apply to your face should be kept out of the path of toilet germs, too. Plus, if you store your makeup in your bathroom, the room's moisture can make it even more susceptible to bacteria growth. Keep beauty supplies out of grime's way in drawers or boxes, and clean brushes and replace makeup as necessary.

4. You use your loofah for way too long Bacteria just loves breeding on these fluffy mesh shower staples, which are designed to hold-in soap and water to help you lather up. Toss them every three to four weeks.

5. You let your towels dry on hooks Washing your bath towels after every three uses is a good rule of thumb, but only if you hang them spread out to dry on a towel bar. If you hang them on hooks, moisture (and any excess soap that's collected) can stay trapped between the folds, which could lead to mildew and bacteria growth.

6. You never run the fan If you haven't already figured out, bathroom moisture can cause a host of yucky issues, so turn on the fan (or open a window) while you shower and for 15 to 20 minutes afterward.

7. You never clean the shower curtain The Scrubbing Bubbles survey also revealed that 42 per cent of their respondents neglect this unassuming item. Feeling lazy about scrubbing residue away? Good news: You can often toss shower curtains in the washing machine. To keep mildew at bay for longer, pull the curtain across your tub (not scrunched to one side) between showers so it can air dry thoroughly.

8. You use your mobile phone in the bathroom If you catch-up on Instagram or go a few rounds in Candy Crush while sitting on the toilet, consider this: Anything you take into the bathroom can get contaminated with lingering germs or faecal matter (16 per cent of mobile phones have it, according to a 2011 study). And even if you wash your hands after every bathroom break, we're guessing you don't also disinfect your phone...and then you put it to your face when you take a call later on. Yes, this is most definitely why you should avoid using your phone in the bathroom.

For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here To contact Dr. Johnson or the Newton Wellesley Dental Partners directly, click here

Original article:  www.housebeautiful.co.uk Artwork:  www.plus.google.com

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