Posts Tagged ‘dental implants’

Dental Implants (Knock Offs & Their Risk) – Wellesley, Newton, MA

Squeezed between billboards promoting “Free Donuts” and “855-Car-Hit-U”,  I recently spotted an ad for $400 dental implants.  Radio also has numerous promotions for “teeth-in-a-day”. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “This makes for a market that creates confusion for the public. There really is a huge difference between quality and cheap”!

There are dozens of dental implant companies that sell implants in the USA. However many of these companies are copies or “clones” of other successful implants.  Since these smaller companies do very little research or development, they are usually 1-2 generations of implant design behind the major companies.  In the many implant complication cases referred to us, we have seen a higher rate of problems in the “clone” implants…even though they look very similar to the major implant brands.

An additional concern is that as smaller implant companies come and go there is a risk of not being able to get parts compatible with these numerous implants to make the crowns or bridges that attach to them.  I would not put a clone implant into a family member’s mouth (not even my mother-in-law!). Innovative companies that approach implant dentistry responsibly with research and education provide quality and service are doing very well, while implant companies that compete only on price are not a good fit for any practice.

Would you want a discounted hip or knee implant? How would you feel if your dentist was charging you the regular price and giving you a cheap implant knockoff?  Do you even ask or know? The consumer needs to know that all implants are not created equal, and they should ask what brand is being used at a particular office.

Here are some implant companies that Dr. Johnson has worked with over his 29 years of clinical practice and have a good track record and lots of data: Biomet 3i, Zimmer Dental, Straumann, Keystone,  Astratech and Nobel Biocare.

  For more information on Dr. Johnson, click here To arrange a consultation or contact the office, click here For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here

Original publication by Dr. Mitchell Josephs on LinkedIn Artwork: www.oralanswers.com

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Using Computers in Implant Dentistry – Newton, Wellesley, MA

There is archeological evidence that humans have attempted to replace missing teeth with root form implants for thousands of years. Remains from ancient China (dating 4000 years ago) have carved bamboo pegs, tapped into the bone, to replace lost teeth, and 2000-year-old remains from ancient Egypt have similarly shaped pegs made of precious metals.

In 1952 the Swedish orthopaedic surgeon, Per-Ingvar Brånemark,project3 was interested in studying bone healing and regeneration. During his research time at Lund University he adopted the Cambridge designed "rabbit ear chamber" for use in the rabbit femur. Following the study, he attempted to retrieve these expensive chambers from the rabbits and found that he was unable to remove them. Brånemark observed that bone had grown into such close proximity with the titanium that it effectively adhered to the metal and the birth of current day implants was seen.

ryneDr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, whom many consider a pioneer in using computer in implant dentistry, has developed a synergistic technique to remove many of the early pitfalls seen in implant placement and dental prosthetics.  He has been performing implant reconstructions since 1989 with the assistance of computers.  His current approach is outlined below:

1.    Initial examination and work up to simulate the final design of the dental prosthesis (think architectural plans when building a home). 2.    Create a three dimensional representation of this plan (either a denture or some other means to position teeth for the patient & doctor to evaluate form, aesthetics, phoneticsproject1 3.    Convert this into a X-ray scanning guide (to wear during the CT scan) or to scan the mouth with CAD/CAM appliance 4.    Merge the digital data into software that creates a 3-D image of the newly designed plan overlaid onto the existing bone contoursproject4 5.    Evaluate bone and other anatomical structures related to planned implant placement 6.    Determine implant angulation, length, diameter, position, etc 7.    Create a surgical placement jig 8.    Place implants using placement jig 9.    Place dental prosthesis (often at same visit as implant placement)

Dr. Johnson uses this approach on most of his dental implant cases and states, “I can’t imagine why more clinicians are not following this protocol as it has diminished our complications and often allows our patients to go home with a ‘tooth’ the same day implants are placed.  Why accept less?

For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here To contact Dr. Johnson or the office, click here.

Original content:  www.wikipedia.com Artwork:  www.perfectdentalimplant.com, www.wikipedia, www.texasimplant.com

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Ceramic Dental Implants – Newton, Wellesely, MA

Are dental implants made from ceramics ready to consider as a viable alternative to metal?

Since their introduction over 40 years ago, dental implants have become an established treatment modality that had revolutionized the concept of replacing missing teeth. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist ryneand managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been considered a pioneer in computer-assisted implant dentistry.  His first implant case was in 1988.  According to Dr. Johnson, “The recent material of choice for manufacturing dental implants is commercially pure titanium, because of its excellent biocompatibilty and mechanical properties However, the gray colour of the titanium may be disadvantageous and give rise to esthetic problems, especially if the soft tissue situation is not optimal and the dark colour shines through the thin peri-implant mucosa.  The profession has been looking for options to address this concern.  Some implant companies are wrapping a pink material along the collar of the implant while others are developing ceramic implants.”

project1Zirconia ceramics (yttrium-stabilized tetragonal poly-crystals) seem to be a suitable material for dental implants because of their tooth-like colour, their excellent mechanical properties and their good biocompatibility. They have extensively been used as ball heads in total hip replacements with remarkable clinical outcomes. Recent animal studies have also shown successful bone healing of dental zirconia implants under both unloaded and loaded conditions.  Dr. Johnson has been using zirconia to fabricate his dental crowns for many years without outstanding success. As the conventional fabrication of zirconia rods usually results in realtively smooth surfaces, only few studies have investigated rough surface modifications of zirconia implants. This is a critical aspect, since it has been already demonstrated that surface roughness and topography also influence osseointegration of zirconia implants.

A recent study by Rita Depprich, et al, in Head and Face Medicine, looks at the comparison of titanium and zirconia implants on pigs and concludes that, “zirconia implants with modified surfaces display features of osseointegration similar to those of titanium implants. These results are promising for using zirconia implants for dental applications in the future”.

“It’s still early in the game” according to Dr. Johnson, “but it may be available in the next few years after clinical trials are complete.  Until then, titanium implants are sill the gold standard. ”

For more information on Dr. Johnson, click here To contact Dr. Johnson or the office, click here

Original article:  https://head-face-med.biomedcentral.com Artwork: www.southerdentalimplant.com

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All-on-Four Dental Implants – Newton, Wellesley, MA

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners rynerecently participated in the American College of Prosthodontics annual meeting in San Diego where he discussed the All-on-4® treatment concept. It provides edentulous and soon-to-be edentulous patients with an efficient and effective restoration using four dental implants to support an immediately-delivered full-arch prosthesis.  Dr. Johnson has been called a pioneer in the synergistic use of computers in implant dentistry. His first case, using a CT scan generated model was performed in 1988.

After the first dental implant patient was treated in the 1980s, a discussion began around the optimal number of implants needed to anchor a fixed dental prosthesis in edentulous patients. Some clinicians tended to install as many implants as possible, often one per tooth. Others argued that biomechanically, only four or even three were needed. Only long-term clinical data could provide answers.

At the forefront

The records of the early patients of P-I Brånemark allowed for an early retrospective study. After a 10-year observation period, the survival rates were demonstrated to be the same for restorations with four and six implants assuming that the bone levels and distribution of implants were ideal. The challenge of advanced resorption remained, however. Because it is not possible in many cases to insert distal implants without grafting and/or nerve lateralization, thproject1e concept of tilting the two distal implants was introduced.

Immediate results

In 2003, the concept of immediate loading (placing a dental prosthesis on implants the same day the implants are placed) of four implants in edentulous lower—and soon after also upper—jaws with two tilted distal implants. This one-stage procedure substantially reduced the costly and time-consuming bone grafting procedures, number of surgeries and healing time.

The success continues

In an early reported a cumulative survival rate of 96.7% for implants and 100% for prostheses at up to 3-year follow up.2 Since then, he and others have repeatedly reproduced high survival rates for both upper and lower jaws.  Today, the All-on-4® treatment concept is used around the world with similar high survival rates and patient satisfaction that is enhanced by limited costs.

Dr. Johnson, with his in-office periodontist, has done hundreds of implant cases with outstanding results.  To arrange a consultation with Dr. Johnson, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

For additional blogs related to dentistry, click here To contact Dr. Johnson or the office, click here Original article and artwork: www.nobelbiocare.com

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Dental Implants & Medications – Newton, Wellesley, MA

Each year, about 500,000 North Americans get dental implants. Dr. Ryne Johnson, ryneprosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, considered by many as a pioneer in the synergistic use of computers in implant dentistry says, “If you are one of them, and are preparing to have a dental implant, it might be a good idea to start taking beta blockers, medication that controls high blood pressure, for a while. And to stop taking heartburn pills”.

A body of research indicates that in order to raise the odds that dental implants will attach properly, there are clear benefits to taking certain common medications and avoiding others.

Bone cell growth, healing and death

"The success of procedures like dental implants depends mainly on how the existing bone accepts the implants to create a connection between the living bone and the surface of the implant," says Dr. Johnson, who has been involved in implant dentistry since 1988. "Because some medications affect bone metabolism and the way that bone cells heal and multiply or die, they can have an important effect on the success of implants."project3

A McGill research team reviewed data about the integration of dental implants gathered from over 700 patients. They then confirmed the results they saw in human patients through studies in rats.

Implications for hip and knee replacements

"We believe that this research may have implications for orthopedic interventions such as hip and knee replacements, because the same mechanisms of bone cell growth break down, and healing take place in all the bones in the body," says one of the researchers. "Our work with implants in rats suggest that this is indeed the case, but further research will be needed to confirm it."

Drugs that aid integration of implants - Beta blockers

  • Conclusions are based on 1499 dental implants in 728 patients between Jan. 2007 -- Sept. 2013 at the East Coast Oral Surgery in Moncton, New Brunswick
  • 327 implants were in 142 people who took beta blockers for hypertension
  • 1172 implants were in 586 people who didn't take beta blockers
  • Failure rates of implants for people using beta blockers was 0.6%
  • Failure rates of implants in people who don't take beta blockers was 4.1%
  • More than 640 million patients around the world take beta blockers to control hypertension.

"We carried out this study because we knew that beta blockers have been reported to increase bone formation," says Prof. Tamimi from McGill's Faculty of Dentistry. "So we thought it was possible that they would also decrease the risk of failure of dental implants. However we didn't expect that there would be such a clear difference in the failure rates for implants between users and non-users of beta blockers. Randomized clinical trials will need to be carried out as well as other studies of large numbers of patients to investigate this phenomenon in more depth."

Drugs that impede integration of dental implants - Heartburn treatment

  • Conclusions are based on 1773 dental implants in 799 patients between Jan. 2007 -- Sept. 2015 at the East Coast Oral Surgery in Moncton, New Brunswick
  • 133 implants were in 58 people who took heartburn medication
  • 1640 implants were in 741 people who don't take heartburn medication
  • Failure rates of implants for people using heartburn medication were 6.8%
  • Failure rates of implants for people not taking heartburn medication were 3.2%
  • More than 20 million Americans, about one in 14 people, take heartburn medication.
  • Heartburn medication is rapidly becoming the third most prescribed pharmaceutical product worldwide, especially for elderly people, who take it either on an occasional or long-term basis.

"Scientists already knew that drugs for heartburn reduce calcium absorption in bones and generally increase the risk of bone fractures," says Dr. Tamimi, of McGill's Faculty of Dentistry. "That is why we wanted to look at how it affects the integration of implants and bone healing after this type of surgery. But we didn't expect to find that the negative effects of these type of drugs would be as great as they are. Further work will need to be done to find the appropriate dosages and time periods that people should take or avoid these medications."

For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here

To learn more about Dental Implants, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Original article:  www.eurekalert.org

Artwork: www.medicalxpress.com

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