Posts Tagged ‘dental’

Scuba Divers Have Special Dental Risks

Scuba divers should consult their dentists periodically to prevent a condition known as "diver's mouth syndrome," says Dr. Ryne Johnson, regarded as Boston’s best prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. Diver's mouth syndrome, known technically as barodontalgia, can include gum problems, pain in the jaw joint, or a condition known as "tooth squeeze," in which changing pressure causes pain in the center of a tooth. "Many divers drag the bulky air regulator through the water with their teeth, and this can cause stress or damage to the oral cavity. Divers may bite too hard on the mouthpiece which can lead to pain in the jaw joint and gum lacerations. Complicating this problem is the fact that most standard mouthpieces are too small for most people and only support the very back teeth. Divers really have to work to keep their lips pursed around these small pieces of rubber." But the problem, he says, is easily remedied. "If a diver feels pain or soreness in the jaw, he or she should consult with a dentist," says Dr. Johnson. "A custom-fitted mouthpiece is available in most scuba shops that will support all of the teeth, so these problems can be avoided." Tooth squeeze can occur when a cavity, a deteriorated or broken dental filling, a dental abscess or an incomplete root canal has developed an air space and reacts to the changing pressure once the diver is under water. It can occur both in descent and ascent as can other squeeze problems. "It can be very painful, but the irony is that many divers do not feel it because of the exhilarating experience they feel at being in the water. When divers do feel tooth squeeze, they should schedule a dentist visit to get the appropriate dental care." Dr. Johnson recommends that divers be in good dental health before diving. Be wary of scuba diving if you have recently undergone dental treatments in which there was a tooth extraction or if a tooth contains a temporary filling. "The change in pressure can cause severe pain and cause healing to take much longer," says Dr. Johnson. “Be cautious if you have dentures. "Be sure they are well-fitted; have them relined or remade if necessary.” Go to a dentist where you can be evaluated for joint pain or earaches. "Custom-made mouthpieces are readily available. Yes, they cost more, but you will be amazed at the difference," says Dr. Johnson. "It's worth the cost because the dive will be much more comfortable." It's never too late to improve your dental health. Visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com for more blogs or to contact Dr. Johnson  

Continue Reading

Sleep Apnea – treatment via a dental appliance

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been treating sleep apnea and finding success with something besides c-pap therapy (which involves putting a mask on overnight). Project1 A 54 year-old patient (name withheld for HIPAA compliance), wakes up every day ready to put his life on the line as a Newton police officer, but there was something draining his energy. "I was constantly fatigued and my wife and co-workers would say, 'Hey, you snore really loud,'” reports one of the city’s top-cops. That snoring revealed a bigger problem: sleep apnea. "The soft palate or the tongue will collapse and actually stop the air from moving," explains Dr. Johnson. "picture a garden hose kinked with no flow -- that's sleep apnea." Dr. Johnson reports an increase in the number of sleep apnea appliances done in his practice and he's finding success at treating it with something known as SUAD appliance. "What they do is limit the ability for one to open typically and it gently holds the lower jaw forward in a position to get the tongue out of the airway," says Dr. Johnson. “The small device is placed inside the mouth during sleep, which is much easier to tolerate for patients who tried the traditional and cumbersome c-pap. "It's night and day," according to the patients Dr. Johnson works with on these sleep apnea appliances.  For one of Newton’s ‘finest’, "I wake up in the morning. I feel refreshed. I didn't even realize how tired I was all the time until my body adjusted to it. It literally changed my life completely." For additional information visit:  www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com  

Continue Reading

Pregnancy & Dental Care

A study  published in the Journal of the American Dental Association identified no evidence to show that dental treatment with anesthetics is harmful during pregnancy. Project1 “Yet so many pregnant women avoid going to the dentist," said study author Aharon Hagai, D.M.D.  "We aimed to determine if there was a significant risk associated with dental treatment with anesthesia and pregnancy outcomes. We did not find any such risk." The researchers compared the pregnancy outcomes between a group of women exposed to dental treatment with anesthetics and a control group that did not have treatment. The study shows that exposure to dental care and local anesthetics during pregnancy is not associated with increased risk for major medical problems in newborns. Examples of such diagnoses include cerebral palsy, cleft lip and heart defect. The study also compared the rate of miscarriages, premature deliveries and birth weight between the two groups, and found no reason to associate dental treatment and local anesthetics with increased risk of negative outcomes. According to the study, previous research shows that many pregnant women do not seek dental treatment, even when a dental problem exists. A mother's oral health during pregnancy is critical, as pregnant women may have increased risk of tooth decay because of increased carbohydrate consumption and difficulties brushing their teeth because of morning sickness, gag reflex and increased gum bleeding. "It is a crucial period of time in a woman's life and maintaining oral health is directly related to good overall health," said Dr. Hagai. "Dentists and physicians should encourage pregnant women to maintain their oral health by continuing to receive routine dental care and seeking treatment when problems arise."  

Continue Reading

Your Money & Dental Products

Just about everyone wastes money when it comes to purchasing and using dental products. We usually use two to three times as much toothpaste as is necessary. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “a pea size drop of toothpaste is sufficient to clean teeth and gums”. Project1 Others suggest that you use enough toothpaste to just cover the toothbrush bristles with a thin flat layer of toothpaste.  Both amounts, however, are far less than what most people use. It seems that over our lifetimes we have been conditioned into thinking that the amounts of toothpaste we see in ads is the amount needed for good oral health. According to Dr. Johnson, “We also tend to waste money when we buy expensive toothpastes containing ingredients which we are led to believe will result in cleaner teeth. Often, however, these ingredients don't result in cleaner teeth but just the sensation of cleaner teeth. Baking soda found in many expensive toothpastes is a prime example”. Although it may make our mouth feel clean, a Journal of the American Dental Association study revealed that baking soda is no more effective in cleaning teeth than normal toothpaste. Another much hyped toothpaste ingredient is peroxide. Peroxide creates small bubbles in the mouth which massage the gums providing a cleaning sensation. While the bubbling action created by peroxide may provide a cleaning sensation it does little to actually clean teeth and gums. The bottom line is that when it comes to toothpaste just about any toothpaste that contains fluoride will do a good job in cleaning our teeth and gums. Another marketing feat has been performed by our friends in the mouthwash industry. Dentists and hygienists have often questioned the claims of mouthwashes to eliminate bad breath and reduce plaque formation. Bad breath is caused by bacteria on tooth surfaces which break down food particles left after we eat. One of the by- products of this breakdown is foul smelling sulfur particles. Most mouthwashes do not eliminate bad breath but simply mask odor - usually only very temporarily. In this respect, most conventional mouthwashes are a waste of money.   Original article in Dollar Stretcher.    

Continue Reading

NEWTON WELLESLEYOrthopedic Associates iconDENTAL PARTNERS
    • Location

      Newton Office:
      447 Centre Street
      Newton, MA - 02458
      Tel : (617) 965-1225

      Wellesley Office:
      332 Washington Street - Suite 240
      Wellesley, MA 02481
      Tel. 781.235.6300

      info@newtonwellesleydentalpartners.org

      Follow us

    • Contact us