Posts Tagged ‘dentist newton’

Can Gum Disease Affect Ovulation?

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “Women struggling to get pregnant need to take good care of their gums, a study has found. Bacteria that causes gum infections appears to have a role in making conception take longer”.  According to a recent study, “Women with bacteria that causes gum disease in their saliva, P. Gingivalis, took three times longer to get pregnant than women without. And women with the bug as well as symptoms of periodontitis - disease of the gum and underlying bone - took four times longer”. Researchers believe that infection in the gums and jawbone leads to further inflammation in the body. This inflammation may prevent ovulation or could stop the embryo implanting. Women struggling to get pregnant need to take good care of their gums, a study has found. Researchers think gum disease might be a warning sign of problems elsewhere in the body - particularly type two diabetes and heart disease”. Additionally, post-menopausal women are more likely to die early if they have gum disease according to this study.  Women who lose teeth after the menopause are at a higher risk of an early death, experts have warned. A major study suggests gum disease and tooth loss is a red flag for severe health problems. Study leader Dr Michael LaMonte, of the University at Buffalo in New York, said no matter the cause of the link, more intensive dental screening in old age could help nip problems in the bud. Other possible effects are inflammation interfering with hormone production, as well as contributing to endometriosis, a condition where tissue that normally grows inside the womb grows elsewhere in the body.  Dr Susanna Paju, of the University of Helsinki said: ‘Our study does not answer the question on possible reasons for infertility but it shows that periodontal bacteria may have a systemic effect even in lower amounts, and even before clear clinical signs of gum disease can be seen. Thus, Dr. Johnson suggests that, “results encourage young women of fertile age to take care of their oral health and attend periodontal evaluations regularly”. How the study was carried out: Researchers at the University of Helsinki studied 256 healthy non-pregnant women aged between 19 and 42 who had stopped contraception and were trying to get pregnant. The health of their mouths and gums, as well as their reproductive organs, were examined.  Over 12 months they were observed as to whether they became pregnant or not.  Researchers believe gum infection leads to further inflammation that may prevent ovulation.   Key findings : Gingivalis Bacteria was ‘significantly more frequently detected in the saliva among women who did not become pregnant during the one-year follow-up period than among those who did.’ The research found women who either had P. Gingivalis in their saliva – or antibodies indicating they had been infected by P Gingivalis, were three times less likely to get pregnant, while those with the bacteria and signs of gum disease were four times less likely to get pregnant. The bacteria remained a factor even after other factors that have an effect on getting pregnant such as socioeconomic status, general health and smoking were considered. Original article:  www.dailymail.co.uk/health Artwork:  www.freepik.com  

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Dental Problems Related to Scuba Diving – Newton, Wellesley, MA

A new survey of recreational scuba divers finds that 41 percent report dental problems related to diving. Most of the problems had to do with pain from the increased pressure underwater or from clutching the air regulator too tightly in their mouths, but a few people experienced loosened crowns or cracked fillings.  ryneDr. Ryne Johnson,  prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners reports that, “over my 30 years in clinical practice, I have seen numerous patient who presented with broken or shifted teeth induced by long-time use of a regulator”.  He further recommends, “The survey was limited, but suggests that people should make sure their teeth are in good shape before they go deep.  An unhealthy tooth underwater would be much more obvious than on the surface.  One hundred feet underwater is the last place you want to be with a fractured tooth."

Underwater toothache

Barodontalgia is a toothache caused by the increase in pressure felt underwater (it can also happen at high altitudes because of low pressure). The condition, which occurs while the person is in the high- or low-pressure environment, is most common in people who have some sort of underlying dental condition, like a cavity or poorly completed filling.  project1

Forty-one percent of respondents of a recent study said they'd experienced dental symptoms while diving. Of those, 42 percent said they'd had barodontalgia. The second-most common symptom was pain from holding the air regulator too tightly (24 percent of those who'd had a dental symptom), and the third-most common problem was jaw pain (22 percent of those who'd had a dental symptom).

Protecting your teeth

Several people reported that a dental crown — a cap that fits over a broken or damaged tooth — had loosened during a dive. One person reported a broken filling.  The dry air and awkward position of the jaw while clenching down on the regulator is an interesting mix. Dive instructors reported more pain and problems than casual divers.  Instructors spend more time at shallower diving depths, where the changes in pressure are most abrupt.

Divers are required to meet a standard of medical fitness before certification, but there are no dental health prerequisites," according to Dr. Johnson.  In the meantime, divers can protect themselves by visiting the dentist before scuba diving to check for decay and other problems.

For more blogs by Dr. Johnson, Click Here To contact Dr. Johnson or the office, Click Here

Original article: http://www.livescience.com Artwork: www.scubadiving.com

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Teeth Grinding & Stress – Newton, Wellesley, MA

Research has found a link between stress and teeth grinding, which 70 percent have reported. Known as bruxism, teeth grinding can go undetected as the most common symptom is a headache, usually concentrated at the temples of the head. Other symptoms include sleep disorders, ear ache, and stiff muscles in the jaw, shoulders and neck. The teeth will also show signs of wear, cracks and tooth loss can result.

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been treating teeth grindinryneg and TMJ therapy for over thirty years.  “Many people grind their teeth at night and we used custom-made, hard appliances (with a softer, resilient liner) to lessen the impact of this significant force” says Johnson.  “The night guard is designed to absorb the impact and spread the force out over all the teeth instead of allowing it to wear away the enamel”.

What the doctor says:  'If you suspect that you are suffering from Bruxism, it is important to see your dentist who can provide a proper diagnosis”.

“Grinding your teeth can be triggered by several factors project1including an underlying sleep disorder, stress and anxiety or a result of dietary intakes such as alcohol and caffeine”.

“Your dentist will recommend a guard specially made for your teeth to create a protective barrier from friction to prevent increased tooth wear and reduce discomfort of the jaw muscles.”

For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson, Click Here

To contact the office or Dr. Johnson, Click Here original article: http://www.dailymail.co.uk

artwork: http://www.arizonafamilydental.com/

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Digital Dentistry Impacts Hollywood – Newton, Wellesley, MA

Digital models of humans can be uncannily accurate these days, but there's at least one area where they fall short: teeth. Unless you're willing to scan the inside of someone's mouth, you aren't going to get a very faithful representation of someone's pearly whites.ryneDr. Ryne Johnson, a prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been considered a pioneer in the use of CAD/CAM technology in dental restorations. He notes that, “Disney Research and ETH Zurich have just developed a technique to digitally recreate teeth beyond the gum line using little more than source data and everyday imagery. The team used 86 3D scans to create a model for an "average" set of teeth, and wrote an algorithm that adapts that model based on what it sees in the contours of teeth in photos and videos.  Unlike the $40,000 CAD/CAM unit that’s used in my office, this new approach allows sufficient accuracy to be captured from regular digital photographs”.

The technology doesn't require any special capture equipment outside of the initial scans (the camera on your phone will do). Also, you don't have to purposefully bare your teeth: it can work with the incomplete information from a smile or grimace. A movie crew could generate models based on a brief, natural motion capture session.project1

This being Disney, the most obvious use is for digital actor models in animated movies and video games. You could see uncannily realistic characters whose details pass muster even in close-up shots. However, there are plenty of medical uses as well. The scientists see dentists using the tech to previsualize a patient's mouth before they sit in the operating chair, and it's easy to imagine this leading to more authentic-looking dentures. As silly as the notion of accurately rendered teeth may be, they could be important for your well-being.

Dr. Johnson feels that this new technology will help the film and media production companies but will not be incorporated into a dental office any time soon.  However, he reminds everyone that, “digital dentistry is here and should be a part of your dental reconstructive and implant work”.

For more blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here To contact Dr. Johnson or the office, click here

Original article:  www.engadget.com Artwork:  Chenglei Wu, Derek Bradley et. al.

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Dental Implants, A Patient’s Primer – Newton, Wellesley, MA

Dental implants have become ‘mainstream’ as a treatment option for many patients.  Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist rsj-10-10-16and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been doing implant supported reconstructions since 1988 and has been regarded as a pioneer in the synergistic use of CT Scans, CAD/CAMs and state of the art dental material science to deliver outstanding results.  He wants people to have some perspective on the process:

Before the procedure

Dental implants require a strong jaw bone. Patients who have lost a lot of jawbone may need to have a bone graft procedure performed before this procedure. Dr. Johnson will identify the available bone…sometimes with a CT Scan if necessary.  In some instances, this can be done BEFORE any teeth are removed (implants may be placed the same day) or AFTER the area has healed from tooth removal (with adequate bone preservation techniques employed at the time of extraction).

You will receive instructions about how to prepare for the day of the procedure. It is highly recommended you quit smoking several months before the procedure as smoking can cause poor osseointegration (poor bone and implant integration), which is the leading cause of implant failure.

Anesthetic

The procedure starts with a local anesthetic. This will make the implant site and the area around it completely numb. project1You will be awake, but you won't be able to feel any pain in that area. You might still feel pressure, vibrations, or some other sensations that might be uncomfortable, but no pain. Some offices offer conscious sedation or partial sedation where you are awake and numb, but "out of it" and mostly unaware of what is going on. Some people describe the feeling as similar to being drunk. Partial sedation is usually more expensive than local anesthetic and is not available at every office.

A dentist applies local anesthetic to a patient's lower jaw. A numbing gel is usually applied so that the patient will not feel the injection.

Preparing the implant site

After the anesthetic has taken effect, the implant site will be prepared and the gums will be retracted so the dentist can access the jawbone and evaluate the implant site. The bone needs to be relatively flat and smooth, and the dentist might use a drill to reshape it.

Drilling the pilot hole

The dentist will then use a series of drills to make a hole in the jawbone for the implant (s)…sometimes a “placement jig” will be fabricated from the CT Scan work up. They will first create a divot using a small round bur, and then a pilot drill to create a pilot hole. They may use a plastic jig prepared from plaster casts to help guide the pilot drill, but this is mostly up to the dentist if they need one. They may also use an alignment pin to make sure the pilot hole is on target. project4If no adjustments are needed, the pilot hole will be drilled deeper. As the hole is being created, the dentist may flush the area with water or saline to keep the bone cool and prevent overheating caused by drilling. Once the pilot hole is finished they will check its alignment again using the alignment pin. If the positioning of the implant is close to other anatomical structures, such as nerves or blood vessels, they may take an x-ray with the alignment pin in place to check its position.

Finishing the hole

When the pilot hole is finished, the dentist will use a series of increasingly larger drill bits until it's the correct diameter for the implant. The size of the implant will have been chosen ahead of time based on the condition of the bone.Usually, your dentist will want to select the largest implant that your bone can sustain because larger implants distribute their load to the bone better than smaller implants do. Most are about 4 mm in diameter.

After the hole for the implant is finished, the alignment will be checked again using the pin. Then the whole will be threaded using a screw tap to match the threads on the implant. Some implants are self-tapping and don't require this step. Dental implants are roughly the size of the root of a normal tooth.

Placing the implant

Finally, the implant will be placed. This can be done using a special head for the dental drill or using a small hand wrench. Sometimes it is actually done using a small torque wrench. This can cause some unpleasant sensations but skilled surgeons are able to minimize the discomfort. The surgical site will be closed using an implant cap and stitches.

Healing and osseointegration

The stitches will be left in place for 7 to 10 days, after which they will be removed. In some cases, the gum flaps may be stitched so that they cover the implant cap as the site heals and the gum tissue will later be trimmed back when the abutment is placed. The implant will be given 3 to 6 months to osseointegrate (fuse with the bone) before the restoration (consisting of the abutment and crown) is placed.

Note: It is extremely important that you keep the implant area and surrounding teeth clean. Peri-implantitis isproject3 a condition that is caused by bacteria infecting the area surrounding an implant and can cause bone loss and implant failure due to poor osseointegration. Some clinics offer "immediate load" implants where a temporary restoration is placed the same day as the implant. This restoration will be removed in the future and a permanent one placed. Not every patient is a candidate for immediate load implants; this is an option you should discuss with your dentist. The treatment will be completed on a second trip, after osseointegration is complete and the abutment and prosthesis is custom-made. Dental implants are made up of three parts; the implant (screw), the abutment (stump), and the crown (tooth).

Final/Definitive restoration

After the implant has healed and is stable, the definitive restoration can be placed. This can consist of a crown, bridge, or denture. The implant cap (think ‘manhoproject2le cover’) is removed and replaced with an abutment and the dental prosthesis is placed on top of it. For most conventional implants, this is a crown that either screws on to the abutment or is cemented in place. Removable restorations like dentures may have clips or snaps of some kind.

After the procedure

Most patients are extremely satisfied after dental implants. After the implant is placed, your dentist will advise you to stick to chewing soft foods while the implant osseointegrates. Immediate load implants will also need time to osseointegrate, and your dentist will tell you when the temporary parts of the implant need to be replaced with a permanent restoration. Patients who have had dental implant surgery say that the pain is mostly a dull ache in their jaw after the anesthetic wears off and it is gone completely within a week. After the final restoration is complete, though, patients are able to treat the prosthetic like a normal tooth and can hardly tell the difference. They look, feel, and can be used just like normal teeth.

For more blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here For more information on dental implants or to arrange a consultation, contact Newton Wellesely Dental Partners.

Original article:  www.medigo.com

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