Posts Tagged ‘implants’

Scuba Divers Have Special Dental Risks

Scuba divers should consult their dentists periodically to prevent a condition known as "diver's mouth syndrome," says Dr. Ryne Johnson, regarded as Boston’s best prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. Diver's mouth syndrome, known technically as barodontalgia, can include gum problems, pain in the jaw joint, or a condition known as "tooth squeeze," in which changing pressure causes pain in the center of a tooth. "Many divers drag the bulky air regulator through the water with their teeth, and this can cause stress or damage to the oral cavity. Divers may bite too hard on the mouthpiece which can lead to pain in the jaw joint and gum lacerations. Complicating this problem is the fact that most standard mouthpieces are too small for most people and only support the very back teeth. Divers really have to work to keep their lips pursed around these small pieces of rubber." But the problem, he says, is easily remedied. "If a diver feels pain or soreness in the jaw, he or she should consult with a dentist," says Dr. Johnson. "A custom-fitted mouthpiece is available in most scuba shops that will support all of the teeth, so these problems can be avoided." Tooth squeeze can occur when a cavity, a deteriorated or broken dental filling, a dental abscess or an incomplete root canal has developed an air space and reacts to the changing pressure once the diver is under water. It can occur both in descent and ascent as can other squeeze problems. "It can be very painful, but the irony is that many divers do not feel it because of the exhilarating experience they feel at being in the water. When divers do feel tooth squeeze, they should schedule a dentist visit to get the appropriate dental care." Dr. Johnson recommends that divers be in good dental health before diving. Be wary of scuba diving if you have recently undergone dental treatments in which there was a tooth extraction or if a tooth contains a temporary filling. "The change in pressure can cause severe pain and cause healing to take much longer," says Dr. Johnson. “Be cautious if you have dentures. "Be sure they are well-fitted; have them relined or remade if necessary.” Go to a dentist where you can be evaluated for joint pain or earaches. "Custom-made mouthpieces are readily available. Yes, they cost more, but you will be amazed at the difference," says Dr. Johnson. "It's worth the cost because the dive will be much more comfortable." It's never too late to improve your dental health. Visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com for more blogs or to contact Dr. Johnson  

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Dental Problems Related to Scuba Diving – Newton, Wellesley, MA

A new survey of recreational scuba divers finds that 41 percent report dental problems related to diving. Most of the problems had to do with pain from the increased pressure underwater or from clutching the air regulator too tightly in their mouths, but a few people experienced loosened crowns or cracked fillings.  ryneDr. Ryne Johnson,  prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners reports that, “over my 30 years in clinical practice, I have seen numerous patient who presented with broken or shifted teeth induced by long-time use of a regulator”.  He further recommends, “The survey was limited, but suggests that people should make sure their teeth are in good shape before they go deep.  An unhealthy tooth underwater would be much more obvious than on the surface.  One hundred feet underwater is the last place you want to be with a fractured tooth."

Underwater toothache

Barodontalgia is a toothache caused by the increase in pressure felt underwater (it can also happen at high altitudes because of low pressure). The condition, which occurs while the person is in the high- or low-pressure environment, is most common in people who have some sort of underlying dental condition, like a cavity or poorly completed filling.  project1

Forty-one percent of respondents of a recent study said they'd experienced dental symptoms while diving. Of those, 42 percent said they'd had barodontalgia. The second-most common symptom was pain from holding the air regulator too tightly (24 percent of those who'd had a dental symptom), and the third-most common problem was jaw pain (22 percent of those who'd had a dental symptom).

Protecting your teeth

Several people reported that a dental crown — a cap that fits over a broken or damaged tooth — had loosened during a dive. One person reported a broken filling.  The dry air and awkward position of the jaw while clenching down on the regulator is an interesting mix. Dive instructors reported more pain and problems than casual divers.  Instructors spend more time at shallower diving depths, where the changes in pressure are most abrupt.

Divers are required to meet a standard of medical fitness before certification, but there are no dental health prerequisites," according to Dr. Johnson.  In the meantime, divers can protect themselves by visiting the dentist before scuba diving to check for decay and other problems.

For more blogs by Dr. Johnson, Click Here To contact Dr. Johnson or the office, Click Here

Original article: http://www.livescience.com Artwork: www.scubadiving.com

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Antidepressants & Dental Implants

For a lot of people, antidepressants are life-changing, and there's no shame in taking them to take care of yourself. But according to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, they might have some unexpected side effects — including messing with your dental implants, new research suggests. Dr. Johnson, who has been called a pioneer in computer-assisted, implant prosthodontics wants patients to know of this correlation. Project1 The study, to be presented at the upcoming conference for the American Association for Dental Research, included 74 participants who all received dental implants during the course of the study. All of the participants were at least 18 years old, and they'd all gotten their implants at the University of Buffalo postdoctoral dental clinic between January and August of 2014. A dental implant is an artificial tooth that your dentist can place into your jaw if you lose a tooth to decay or injury. What's supposed to happen is new bone forms around the implant to secure it in place. But when the researchers went back and looked at the medical information for those 74 people, they found that those who were taking antidepressants — but not necessarily those who were currently suffering from depression symptoms — were more likely to have an implant failure than those who weren't taking the drugs. Among those who did have implant failures, 33% of participants reported taking at least one antidepressant drug. However, among those who didn't have any problems with their implants, only 11% took antidepressants. It's important to note that this is a small preliminary study, but this isn't the first time antidepressants have been linked to problems with bones and teeth. A 2007 study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that antidepressants could speed up bone loss in older women. And way back in 2003, another study in the Journal of the American Dental Association found that many dental patients are given medications that may interfere with their antidepressants, possibly creating an environment for tooth problems. Researchers think that because these drugs often act on our serotonin receptors, which are important for both our moods and our bones, they may be doing some damage under the radar. Still, this isn't a reason to start skipping your much-needed meds — but it's always a great idea to touch base with your doctor about side effects.   For more information about implants, Dr. Johnson, or other blog topics, visit: www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com   Original article: refinery29.com Artwork: backhealthforyou.com  

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Your Money & Dental Products

Just about everyone wastes money when it comes to purchasing and using dental products. We usually use two to three times as much toothpaste as is necessary. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “a pea size drop of toothpaste is sufficient to clean teeth and gums”. Project1 Others suggest that you use enough toothpaste to just cover the toothbrush bristles with a thin flat layer of toothpaste.  Both amounts, however, are far less than what most people use. It seems that over our lifetimes we have been conditioned into thinking that the amounts of toothpaste we see in ads is the amount needed for good oral health. According to Dr. Johnson, “We also tend to waste money when we buy expensive toothpastes containing ingredients which we are led to believe will result in cleaner teeth. Often, however, these ingredients don't result in cleaner teeth but just the sensation of cleaner teeth. Baking soda found in many expensive toothpastes is a prime example”. Although it may make our mouth feel clean, a Journal of the American Dental Association study revealed that baking soda is no more effective in cleaning teeth than normal toothpaste. Another much hyped toothpaste ingredient is peroxide. Peroxide creates small bubbles in the mouth which massage the gums providing a cleaning sensation. While the bubbling action created by peroxide may provide a cleaning sensation it does little to actually clean teeth and gums. The bottom line is that when it comes to toothpaste just about any toothpaste that contains fluoride will do a good job in cleaning our teeth and gums. Another marketing feat has been performed by our friends in the mouthwash industry. Dentists and hygienists have often questioned the claims of mouthwashes to eliminate bad breath and reduce plaque formation. Bad breath is caused by bacteria on tooth surfaces which break down food particles left after we eat. One of the by- products of this breakdown is foul smelling sulfur particles. Most mouthwashes do not eliminate bad breath but simply mask odor - usually only very temporarily. In this respect, most conventional mouthwashes are a waste of money.   Original article in Dollar Stretcher.    

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