Posts Tagged ‘oral’

A Cancer Screening from Saliva?

Project1 According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “A 10-minute cancer test which can be taken at home using just a drop of may be the wave of the future”. Scientists at California State University says it is possible to detect tumor DNA when is it circulating in bodily fluids – an approach known as a liquid biopsy.  The saliva test is 100 per cent accurate and is so simple that it could be carried out at a pharmacist, the dentist or even in the privacy of someone's own home if they were concerned. Currently scientists can only use blood tests to detect cancer if they have already taken a biopsy and sequenced a tumor, so they know which genetic signature to look for. Although this can be used to monitor cancer spread it cannot be used for an initial test. And it can throw up false positive. Tests have shown that just a single drop of saliva contains enough data to give a definitive diagnosis as soon as a tumor develops, he said. The test is non-invasive and cheap, costing around just $20. It is due to enter full clinical trials in lung cancer patients later this year, and is expecting approval within two years from the Food and Drug Administration in America. “If there is circulating signature of a tumor in a person blood or saliva, this test will find it,” research scientists told the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in Washington. “We need less than one drop of saliva and we can turn the test around in 10 minutes. It can be done in a doctor’s office while you wait. “Early detection is crucial. Any time you gain in finding out that someone has a life-threatening cancer, the sooner the better. With this capability, it can be implemented by the patient themselves in a home check, or dentist or pharmacy.” The test looks for genetic mutations in blood plasma which are consistent with a tumor. “The advantages of this technology is that it is non-invasive. If you have a credible early screening risk assessment technology that people can use on their own or at dentists’ office or pharmacists - that’s the key, early detection.” For more information or for other blogs of interest, visit:  www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com   Original article at:  http://www.telegraph.co.uk  

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Pregnancy & Dental Care

A study  published in the Journal of the American Dental Association identified no evidence to show that dental treatment with anesthetics is harmful during pregnancy. Project1 “Yet so many pregnant women avoid going to the dentist," said study author Aharon Hagai, D.M.D.  "We aimed to determine if there was a significant risk associated with dental treatment with anesthesia and pregnancy outcomes. We did not find any such risk." The researchers compared the pregnancy outcomes between a group of women exposed to dental treatment with anesthetics and a control group that did not have treatment. The study shows that exposure to dental care and local anesthetics during pregnancy is not associated with increased risk for major medical problems in newborns. Examples of such diagnoses include cerebral palsy, cleft lip and heart defect. The study also compared the rate of miscarriages, premature deliveries and birth weight between the two groups, and found no reason to associate dental treatment and local anesthetics with increased risk of negative outcomes. According to the study, previous research shows that many pregnant women do not seek dental treatment, even when a dental problem exists. A mother's oral health during pregnancy is critical, as pregnant women may have increased risk of tooth decay because of increased carbohydrate consumption and difficulties brushing their teeth because of morning sickness, gag reflex and increased gum bleeding. "It is a crucial period of time in a woman's life and maintaining oral health is directly related to good overall health," said Dr. Hagai. "Dentists and physicians should encourage pregnant women to maintain their oral health by continuing to receive routine dental care and seeking treatment when problems arise."  

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Your Money & Dental Products

Just about everyone wastes money when it comes to purchasing and using dental products. We usually use two to three times as much toothpaste as is necessary. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “a pea size drop of toothpaste is sufficient to clean teeth and gums”. Project1 Others suggest that you use enough toothpaste to just cover the toothbrush bristles with a thin flat layer of toothpaste.  Both amounts, however, are far less than what most people use. It seems that over our lifetimes we have been conditioned into thinking that the amounts of toothpaste we see in ads is the amount needed for good oral health. According to Dr. Johnson, “We also tend to waste money when we buy expensive toothpastes containing ingredients which we are led to believe will result in cleaner teeth. Often, however, these ingredients don't result in cleaner teeth but just the sensation of cleaner teeth. Baking soda found in many expensive toothpastes is a prime example”. Although it may make our mouth feel clean, a Journal of the American Dental Association study revealed that baking soda is no more effective in cleaning teeth than normal toothpaste. Another much hyped toothpaste ingredient is peroxide. Peroxide creates small bubbles in the mouth which massage the gums providing a cleaning sensation. While the bubbling action created by peroxide may provide a cleaning sensation it does little to actually clean teeth and gums. The bottom line is that when it comes to toothpaste just about any toothpaste that contains fluoride will do a good job in cleaning our teeth and gums. Another marketing feat has been performed by our friends in the mouthwash industry. Dentists and hygienists have often questioned the claims of mouthwashes to eliminate bad breath and reduce plaque formation. Bad breath is caused by bacteria on tooth surfaces which break down food particles left after we eat. One of the by- products of this breakdown is foul smelling sulfur particles. Most mouthwashes do not eliminate bad breath but simply mask odor - usually only very temporarily. In this respect, most conventional mouthwashes are a waste of money.   Original article in Dollar Stretcher.    

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One-fourth of Americans lie to dentists about flossing

One-fourth of Americans lie to dentists about flossing: survey More than a quarter of Americans lie about it, and 36 percent say they would rather do an unpleasant activity like cleaning the toilet or working on their taxes. Flossing one's teeth, according to a Harris Poll survey, is in some cases a less desirable activity than listening to the sound of nails on a chalkboard or to small children crying on a bus or plane. But according to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners who jokes, "Only floss the teeth you wish to keep". The survey was conducted as part of the American Academy of Periodontology's national campaign called "Love The Gums You're With." The industry group seeks to bring more awareness to gum disease. The survey found that the top three unpleasant activities that people would rather do than floss were washing a sink full of dirty dishes (18 percent preferred), cleaning the toilet (14 percent) and waiting in a long check-out line (14 percent). When analyzed by city, New Yorkers said they were more likely to floss daily, while people in Atlanta were more likely to be honest about flossing when asked by their dentists. Those in Chicago were more likely to prefer sitting in an hour of gridlock traffic than flossing. Overall, more than one-quarter of those surveyed said they lied to their dentists about flossing. The survey also showed that 88 percent of Americans would be somewhat or very likely to tell a friend if they had something stuck in their teeth, with those living in the Washington area the least likely to do so. The poll was conducted online March 20-30 on behalf of the American Academy of Periodontology. Harris Poll surveyed 2,021 American adults in the 10 largest U.S. cities. (Reporting by Kylie Gumpert)flossing

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