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Using Computers in Implant Dentistry – Newton, Wellesley, MA

There is archeological evidence that humans have attempted to replace missing teeth with root form implants for thousands of years. Remains from ancient China (dating 4000 years ago) have carved bamboo pegs, tapped into the bone, to replace lost teeth, and 2000-year-old remains from ancient Egypt have similarly shaped pegs made of precious metals.

In 1952 the Swedish orthopaedic surgeon, Per-Ingvar Brånemark,project3 was interested in studying bone healing and regeneration. During his research time at Lund University he adopted the Cambridge designed "rabbit ear chamber" for use in the rabbit femur. Following the study, he attempted to retrieve these expensive chambers from the rabbits and found that he was unable to remove them. Brånemark observed that bone had grown into such close proximity with the titanium that it effectively adhered to the metal and the birth of current day implants was seen.

ryneDr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, whom many consider a pioneer in using computer in implant dentistry, has developed a synergistic technique to remove many of the early pitfalls seen in implant placement and dental prosthetics.  He has been performing implant reconstructions since 1989 with the assistance of computers.  His current approach is outlined below:

1.    Initial examination and work up to simulate the final design of the dental prosthesis (think architectural plans when building a home). 2.    Create a three dimensional representation of this plan (either a denture or some other means to position teeth for the patient & doctor to evaluate form, aesthetics, phoneticsproject1 3.    Convert this into a X-ray scanning guide (to wear during the CT scan) or to scan the mouth with CAD/CAM appliance 4.    Merge the digital data into software that creates a 3-D image of the newly designed plan overlaid onto the existing bone contoursproject4 5.    Evaluate bone and other anatomical structures related to planned implant placement 6.    Determine implant angulation, length, diameter, position, etc 7.    Create a surgical placement jig 8.    Place implants using placement jig 9.    Place dental prosthesis (often at same visit as implant placement)

Dr. Johnson uses this approach on most of his dental implant cases and states, “I can’t imagine why more clinicians are not following this protocol as it has diminished our complications and often allows our patients to go home with a ‘tooth’ the same day implants are placed.  Why accept less?

For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here To contact Dr. Johnson or the office, click here.

Original content:  www.wikipedia.com Artwork:  www.perfectdentalimplant.com, www.wikipedia, www.texasimplant.com

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9 Tips That Will Save Your Teeth From Coffee Stains – Newton, Wellesley, MA

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners wants to help you protect your teeth from permanent discoloration without giving up your caffeine addiction.project1

Why does coffee stain teeth? Enamel, the hard outer coating that protects the other layers of your teeth, is covered in microscopic gaps. When food and drink particles get stuck in those gaps, it forms an extrinsic stain, which just means the outer layer of your tooth is discolored. But the longer the particles stay in the gaps, they start to affect other layers of the tooth. “The more you drink [coffee] and don’t do anything to remove it, the stain goes deeper and deeper,” says Denise Estafan, DDS, an associate professor at the New York University College of Dentistry. This is called an intrinsic stain, and it’s a lot harder to clean. Here are ways you didn't even realize you're staining your teeth.

Brushing: Your first plan of attack The primary cause of a tooth stain is plaque accumulation, so brushing your teeth with whitening toothpaste and seeing your dentist for regular cleanings are the best ways to prevent ugly coffee stains. But trying these additional tricks can keep your teeth sparkling in between dentist visits. The best part? You don’t need to give up your morning pick-me-up. By the way: Are you making these tooth-brushing mistakes?

Don’t forget to floss. Seriously. Let’s be honest: It’s hard to floss as regularly as dentists want you to. But setting aside a few minutes each day—morning or night—can make a big impact on your oral health. It gets rid of plaque generally, and plaque attracts stains. Brushing alone doesn’t remove all the bacteria in your mouth. Whatever is left over could harden and turn into tartar, which can cause infections.

Use a straw. Less liquid touches your teeth when you drink it through a straw. The smaller the straw, the better. This comes more naturally to iced coffee drinkers, but it works for hot coffee too.

Mix baking soda and hydrogen peroxide Make your own whitening paste by mixing a small amount of baking soda with a small amount of hydrogen peroxide (this is what dentists use to clean your teeth, but you can buy it over-the-counter at drugstores). The paste should be pretty runny. If it’s too gritty, that means there’s too much baking soda, and you could scrub off your enamel. Here's how you can whiten your teeth with natural ingredients from home.

Add milk Estafan says that a splash of milk can make a real difference for your teeth. A study published in the International Journal of Dental Hygiene found that casein, the main protein in milk, can latch onto tannins in tea (bitter-tasting particles that leave residue on teeth) and prevent staining. In fact, Ava Chow, the lead researcher in this study, says it may work even better than whitening toothpaste. Coffee also has small amounts of tannins, so coffee drinkers can reap these dairy benefits too. For the best results, use high fat animal milk; soy milk won’t do the job.

Sip water between cups of coffee A swig of water can wash away staining liquids quickly before they start to set into your teeth. Even though science shows coffee isn’t dehydrating, this is still a great way to stay hydrated throughout the day.

Drink it quickly Let's say you and your coworker both grab cups of coffee when you get into the office. You drink your whole cup in five minutes, but your coworker takes his time and finishes the same amount of coffee in two hours. Lucky for you, Estafan says that your teeth will be the less-stained ones. Since your coworker exposed his teeth to the coffee for a longer period of time, his will be more stained. Wash even more particles away by following that quick cup with a glass of water. Just don’t burn yourself.

Chew sugar-free gum Conquer coffee breath and clean your teeth at the same time. Chewing gum increases the amount of saliva in your mouth, and saliva washes away acids and plaque from your teeth. According to the American Dental Association, chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes after eating can help prevent tooth decay.

For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here To contact Dr. Johnson or the office, click here

Original Article: http://www.rd.com/health Artwork: www.DoclandsDental.ie

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Gum Disease and Pancreatic Cancer – Newton, Wellesley, MA

Gum disease may cause more than just bad breath, according to a new study presented at the 2016 American Association for Cancer Research meeting, which points to a connection between periodontal disease as a potential early marker for pancreatic cancer. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “This could pave the way for early detection of pancreatic cancer – one of the most deadly forms of the disease –because of the advanced stage at which it is often diagnosed”. Project1

It is estimated that in 2016, 53,070 new cases of pancreatic cancer will be diagnosed with only 7.7 percent of victims surviving 5 years.  Initial findings support a hypothesis and previous research showing that people who have developed pancreatic cancer tended to have poor oral health. The researchers reasoned that periodontitis, which is inflammation of the tissue around the teeth often causing shrinkage of the gums and loosening of the teeth, is due to oral bacteria dysbiosis.  Dysbiosis is a term for an unhealthy change in the normal bacterial ecology of a part of the body, such as the mouth.

Many previous studies have shown a strong relationship between associated periodontal disease with pancreatic cancer. Findings from a 2013 European prospective cohort study showed having high levels of P gingivalis antibodies in blood caused a 2-fold increase of developing pancreatic cancer. Another 2007 prospective cohort study looked at over 50,000 male health professionals with a history of periodontitis and found a 64 percent increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Both of these previous studies however, were unable to determine which came first, poor oral health or pancreatic cancer.

A new study from NYU is the first study to determine that periodontal dysbiosis does in fact precede the development of pancreatic cancer and does not develop after the diagnosis. This was determined by looking at the oral samples of saliva collected prior to the onset of pancreatic cancer confirming the positive association with P gingivalis.

Researchers pointed out that this finding does not confirm that the two periodontal disease-causing bacteria cause pancreatic cancer. Rather, they most likely correlate it with systemic inflammation occurring within the body, known to be a precursor for developing cancer. Having periodontal disease-causing bacteria in the mouth may increase the likelihood of inflammation.

Symptoms of pancreatic cancer

The pancreas is located deep within the abdomen sandwiched between the stomach and the spine, with a small portion of it nestled in the curve of the upper portion of the small intestine. It functions as a glandular organ having an essential role in converting the food we eat into fuel for the body’s cells. It has an exocrine function of secreting digestive enzymes into the small intestine helping with digestion, and an endocrine function of releasing the hormone insulin into the bloodstream, a critical controller of blood sugar levels.

Tumors of the pancreas are rarely palpable, which is why most symptoms of pancreatic cancer do not appear until the tumor has grown large enough to interfere with the functioning of the pancreas, or has spread to other nearby organs such as the stomach, liver, or gallbladder. Symptoms of pancreatic cancer may include:

•    Upper abdominal pain spreading to the back

•    Jaundice or yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes

•    Diminished appetite and unexplained weight loss

•    Fatigue

•    Digestive difficulties

•    Nausea

•    New onset of Type 2 diabetes in people over 50

Risk factors which may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer include:

•    Cigarette smoking

•    Age – over 80 percent of pancreatic cancers develop between the ages of 60 and 80

•    Race – more common in African Americans

•    Gender – more common in men

•    Religious background – more common in Ashkenazi Jews

•    Chronic pancreatitis

•    Diabetes

•    Obesity

•    Diet – diets high in meats, cholesterol, fried foods and nitrosamines

•    Family history

Future additional studies are planned to determine if periodontal disease is a cause of pancreatic cancer. Until then, good oral hygiene including regular brushing and flossing of the teeth and visits to a dentist are recommended. If a person does have periodontal disease, they should be seen regularly by a periodontist for regular cleanings and checkups to get the condition under control.

Anyone who has any of the potential symptoms of pancreatic cancer should make an appointment with their physician for an evaluation and testing as soon as possible.

For additional dentally related blogs, click here. To contact Dr. Johnson, click here. To get more information on Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, click here.

Original article:  http://www.foxnews.com/health Artwork: www.medicineworld.org

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